This endangered duck is one of the rarest species of waterfowl.

Madagascar teal are also known at Bernier’s teal.  They are a species of small, brown duck with a pinkish bill. Males and females look the same, although the female’s bill and legs may be slightly browner in color with black scalloping.

What They Eat

Madagascar teal are found only in the African island country of Madagascar and live mainly on the West coast of the island. They are usually found near shallow lakes or rivers with and adjacent wetland or marshes.

Where They Live

Madagascar teal are found only in the African island country of Madagascar and live mainly on the West coast of the island. They are usually found near shallow lakes or rivers with and adjacent wetland or marshes.

What They Do

Madagascar teal nest in tree holes, often in mangrove trees, and always close to water. Nest holes have been found 3-10 feet above the water surface. One nest may contain up to 7 eggs.

How They’re Doing

Madagascar teal are endangered and one of the most rare of the waterfowl species. They were first described in 1860, but because there was so little known about them, the species was considered ‘rediscovered’ in 1969.  A captive breeding program began at a facility in Madagascar in 1995, and by 1998, the first captive ducklings had hatched.  Madagascar teal are now part of a Species Survival Plan—a breeding program in zoos to help maintain genetic diversity.  The Minnesota Zoo currently exhibits one adult pair and, to date, eight ducklings have hatched.

Where in the World

Madagascar

Habitat

Lakes and rivers near wetlands

Conservation Status

conservationStatus_CR

Animal Facts

Body length: 16 inches
Weight: up to .85 pounds
Lifespan: up to 18 years

Taxonomic Category

Bird

Where at the Zoo

Tropics Trail

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Madagascar Teal